NEW BEER: Spring into Belgium at BrickHouse Brewery

Brew team. Brian Kosmic, left and Arthur Zimmerman.

Brew team. Paul Komsic, left and Arthur Zimmerman.

We hope you were able to check out our article about BrickHouse in the spring issue of Edible Long Island, where we told you about the upcoming new releases from the Patchogue brew pub. Well, the spring “saison” (aka season) is finally here.

Over the next couple months, BrickHouse Brewery will be rolling out their new Belgian beers, all of which have been fermented using the same fruity, peppery saison yeast.

On tap now is Walter Wit, a traditional Belgian style Wheat Ale in the same vein as Hoegaarden or Blue Moon. “Wits in general are a great intro to craft beer,” says head brewer Arthur Zimmerman. Instead of using orange peel, a typical wit ingredient, BrickHouse’s version is flavored with grains of paradise and orange and grapefruit peel to add a pop and refreshing crispness. “We hope this beer gets people to make the full jump to drinking nice, local products.”

The same saison yeast is the backbone for all five beers and produces vastly different results. Once they are all behind the bar, we think a Belgian tasting flight is in order.

Zimmerman and brewer Paul Komsic have also been seeking outside influence. To celebrate International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day, they partnered with local group Girls Pint Out and worked on a recipe. The result was Mademoiselle, a Belgian red ale flavored with Earl Grey tea from neighboring Roast. Flying Dutchman, an Imperial Belgian IPA, is set to be brewed in the next couple weeks with award winning homebrewer Brian Giebel. Featuring Australian, American and noble German hops the beer aims for a “nice blending of all the different worlds of hops.”

Currently fermenting is a dark spiced porter, not always a style that comes to mind for warm weather. It’s affectionately been named Keel Hauled, since Zimmerman and Komsic refer to it as a “pirate porter.” “We threw the whole kitchen sink in there,” says Zimmerman of the Vietnamese cinnamon, red pepper, raisin and molasses additions. “If you go over by the tanks it smells like a nice cinnamon raisin bagel with a porter on the side.”

Rounding out the lineup is Aegis, a biere de garde. Zimmerman says this one is most true to style; it just happens to be a style that isn’t often brewed or showcased. The yeast adds notes of tangerine and black pepper, despite no fruit or spice in the recipe. The result is a sweet, malty, full bodied beer with a slightly hoppy finish.

The same saison yeast is the backbone for all five beers and produces vastly different results. Once they are all behind the bar, we think a Belgian tasting flight is in order.

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