5 Places to Celebrate National Clam Chowder Day All Year Long

Is there anything better than a hot bowl of clam chowder on a cold night? We think not.

There is nothing more satisfying on a cold winter night then eating a steaming hot bowl of clam chowder. Fortunately, Long Island restaurants make some of the best. Which is why we celebrate National Clam Chowder Day (February 25) all year-long.

Here are five places we like to celebrate.

1. The Cull House
75 Terry Street, Sayville

Family owned and operated since 1977, The Cull House offers the best in fresh, local and sustainable seafood. They offer both New England and Manhattan clam chowder either in a cup or in a bread bowl. Along with their wonderful chowders, they have great seafood dishes like cedar plank whiskey salmon, king crab legs and grilled Mahi Mahi tacos.

2. Noah’s Restaurant
136 Front Street, Greenport

If you haven’t been to Noah’s you must go. It has been a staple in Greenport since 2010. Under the direction of native Long Islander, Executive Chef Noah Schwartz, Noah’s is known for its trademark seafood inspired small plates which feature locally sourced ingredients. Along with an extensive raw bar, and an assortment of seafood dishes, Noah’s makes a delectable Long Island Clam Chowder featuring local littleneck clams, fingerling potatoes, soffrito, fine herbs and a touch of cream.

3. Bigelow’s Seafood
79 North Long Beach Road, Rockville Centre

Chowdaaa #NewEnglandClamChowder #Bigelows #Seafood #Soup

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Since 1939, Bigelow’s Seafood has been the spot in Rockville Centre for fried seafood, made with fresh oil daily. It was Russ Bigelow who first introduced the Ipswich clam to Long Island. The recipe for the fried clam belly has not changed since 1939, and neither has the restaurant which still has the same charm. Their chowders are made fresh daily using the finest ingredients available. For over seventy years, they have been getting fresh clams from the same New England vendor. Their New England clam chowder is white, creamy and decadent, while their Manhattan Chowder is red, brothy and delicious.

4. The Steam Room
4 East Broadway, Port Jefferson

When you do a job in Port Jeff you eat lunch at steamroom.

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For thirty-five years people have been flocking to The Steam Room in the heart of Port Jefferson. Located across from the ferry, The Steam Room offers beautiful views of Port Jefferson Harbor, along with great food. They use only the finest, freshest seafood, and offer everything from soft-shell crab on a bun, to shrimp scampi, fried platters, lobsters, clam bakes and more. And of course there is clam chowder! Their New England and Manhattan clam chowders are made fresh daily and are offered by the cup, bowl or bread bowl, as well as quart size take out containers.

5. Jeff’s Surf and Turf
217 New York Avenue, Huntington

This tiny restaurant is known for takeout, but they do have a number of tables to eat at for dining in. It is owned and operated by Jeff’s Seafood, located north on New York Avenue. Jeff’s Seafood has been one of the premier seafood markets on Long Island since it was established in 1969. Now people have a place where they can take out fresh, cooked seafood lunches and dinners including lobster rolls, surf and turf, grilled sea bass and stuffed flounder. As for chowders, they offer four – New England, Manhattan, crab and corn, and Long Island clam chowder. Each one is delicious!

 

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Kerriann Flanagan Brosky

Seven-time, award winning author and historian Kerriann Flanagan Brosky is best known for her Ghosts of Long Island books and her inspirational novel The Medal. She has been featured in a number of publications, and has appeared on radio and television. She is the co-author of Delectable Italian Dishes for Family and Friends with Sal Baldanza. Historic Haunts of Long Island: Ghosts and Legends from the Gold Coast to Montauk Point is her latest book. When not writing Kerriann spends her time cooking. Visit her at www.kerriannflanaganbrosky.com.